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Editorial: The future of water

Editorial: The future of water

Many of us in Canada take water for granted. World Water Day (March 22) reminds us that as the human population continues to grow, putting greater demand on all resources, and as climate change exacerbates drought in many places, we can’t be complacent.

Our cities may not be running out of water yet, but people in Cape Town didn’t expect their water supply to go dry. The four-million residents of South Africa’s second-largest city could see their taps turned off by May 11, called “Day Zero” – or sooner, if people don’t obey severe water restrictions.

Cape Town is entering its fourth year of drought – the worst in 100 years, with an average of 234 millimetres of rainfall a year for the past three years, less than half the average since 1977.

Cape Town isn’t the only city with these problems. São Paulo, Bangalore, Beijing, Cairo, Jakarta, Moscow, Istanbul, Mexico City, London, Tokyo and Miami all face water shortages related to climate change, population growth, waste and mismanagement.

Canada has more freshwater per capita than most countries, but not as much as we might think. Although water covers 70 per cent of Earth’s surface, only three per cent is fresh. Canada has about 20 per cent of the world’s freshwater, but only seven per cent of renewable freshwater. (A lot is stored in glaciers, lakes and aquifers that aren’t being replenished, or at least not fast enough to replace usage.) As our agricultural and industrial activity expand and population grows, water demands grow and more sources become polluted.

Cape Town introduced a number of measures to combat its crisis. People are restricted to 50 litres of freshwater a day, going down to 25 after Day Zero – although average consumption is still about 95 litres a day. Europeans average 100 litres a day, and Canadians each used about 250 litres a day in 2013, down from 330 in 2005, not including industrial, commercial and other uses. Consumption has been declining as more people install low-flow shower heads, faucets and toilets.

One lesson from places like Cape Town is that we should start tackling the issue now rather than waiting until it becomes a crisis. We must get better at conserving water, preventing water pollution and protecting natural ecosystems like forests and wetlands that filter and store water while also preventing flooding. Beyond the obvious ways to conserve household water, we should also rethink our obsession with lawns that need constant watering, and discourage luxuries like private swimming pools.

Some say our next major wars could be about water rather than resources like oil. If we in Canada and elsewhere plan properly, that needn’t be the case.  David Suzuki

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